• Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon

Like us on Facebook!

Follow us on Twitter!

Contact us

bestviewscholars@gmail.com

28 Briarglen Court Unit B, Toronto, ON, Canada M1W 3Z7

©2019 by Bestview Scholars Publishing Ltd.

Our Authors

A

Ah Zhu (1957–), pseudonym of Liu Xuezhu, reporter and writer, who has published news articles and reportage. He has also co-authored An Introduction to the Culture of Tourism.*

An Liang (1962–) is the pseudonym of Min Shilin (闵师林), PhD. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China who has been writing since childhood. During the past thirty-five years or so, he has published thirty-two books of literary works, including five books of short-short stories, ten of literary nonfiction, five of poetry, and a novel. He also writes plays and literary reportage. He has won twelve awards for his short-short stories, fifteen for his literary nonfiction, eight for his poetry, and three for his other literary works.

 

An Shiliu (1964–), whose official name is Shao Meiying (邵玫英), was born in Mudanjiang, Heilongjiang. She has published five books of short-short stories, ten short stories and a novella. She has won ten short-short story awards.

 

B

Bai Wenling (1962–), a native of Shangqiu in Henan, is a member of the Writers’ Association of Henan. He is also the Chair of Minquan County’s Writers’ Association. Besides an earlier collection of short-short fiction, he has published more than 300 other short-short stories. For his short-short fiction, he has collected more than 120 prizes and awards.

 

Bai Xiaoyi (1960–) works for a literary magazine in Shenyang, Liaoning. A recognized short-short story writer, he has written many short-short stories.*

 

Bing Ling (1956–), officially known as Jiang Weimin (姜卫民), is known as a humor writer. He has published three books including ninety short-short stories, fifty short stories, and six novellas. He also holds three academic titles in China and two other titles in the United States.

 

C

Cai Zhongfeng (1968–), is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and the Chair of the Contemporary Super-Short (微篇) Story Writers’ Association. He is one of the most prolific short-short story writers in China. He has published more than 3,000 short-short stories including twenty books in his possession. He has also edited more than 200 literary works. He has won more than 220 short-short story prizes and awards from different levels, including the prestigious Wang Cengqi Award for Fiction Written in Chinese (汪曾祺华语小说奖).

 

Cao Duoyong (1962–) was born in Dahe Village, Anhui. A Literary award winner, he has published a novel, The Dahe Bay, and several novellas, and many short-short stories.*

 

Cao Mengxin (1972–) was born in Shandong. She is a member of the Literary Nonfiction Writers’ Association of China and also a member of Dezhou Writers’ Association, Shandong. She has published a book of literary nonfiction and has won five awards for five of the pieces included in the collection. Besides a novella which won a bronze medal, she has also published a book of short-short stories entitled A Dream Keeps You Warm and has won a short-short story award.

 

Chen Dachao (1958–) was born in Nanzhang, Hubei, but he lives in Xiaogan. He resigned from his permanent job in 1998 and became an independent fulltime writer living on his royalties until he retired recently. All writings included, he has authored well over 1,000 literary works. In the category of fiction alone, he has published 350 short-short stories, thirty short stories, three novellas, and two novels. He has won nine awards for his short-short stories and two for his short stories.

 

Chen Lifeng (1958–) was born and grew up in Henan. He has published many stories as well as essays on social issues, totaling more than one hundred pieces. He is the associate editor-in-chief of a college journal in Henan.*

 

Chen Wenwei (1948–), or Chan Manwai in Cantonese, is a prominent Hong Kong writer. He has published more than thirty books including a trilogy of novels entitled Ren Xiang Liu Shui (Humans Are Like Running Water), over 100 short stories, two novellas, and children’s poetry, among others.

 

Chen Xiuping (1971–), is the associate editor-in-chief of the Yangze Weekly of Jiujiang Daily currently in charge of its month-end Yangtze River Literature page. He has published more than sixty short-short stories, some of which have been included in various short-short story selections. He also writes short stories and poetry. He has won five awards for his short-short fiction.

 

Chen Yonglin (1972–) is an editor working for the prestigious Chinese magazine Selected weixing [short-short] Stories. Winner of a national short-short story contest, he is an active writer who has written many short-short stories.*

 

Chen Zhenchang (1945–) calls himself an amateur writer who enjoys reading, thinking and writing. Besides two other books in his possession, he has published 120 short-short stories, twelve short stories and a novella. He has also written and published literary nonfiction. He has won twenty-one awards for his short-short stories, as well as a short story award.

 

Chen Zipeng (1959–), holds a doctorate in education and is a government-certified “Superior-Class” Teacher. He is the director of the Tiantie Education Center in Tianjin and also the Education Superintendent of Tianjin. Besides the more than twenty academic titles he has edited or authored, he has written 300 short-short stories and won two short-short story awards.

Cheng Siliang (1973–) is the first advocate of flash fiction in China. He is the Chair of the Special Committee for the Study of Flash Fiction of the Association for the Study of Fables of China, and also the Vice-Chair of Jiangsu Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story. He has published six books of short-short stories and won twelve short-short story awards.

 

Chu Gejin (19??–) lives and works in Macao, China. (No further information is available about the writer at the time of publication.)

 

Chu Meng (1963–) is the pseudonym of Ni Zhangrong (倪章荣) who is a writer and a literary and historical scholar. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and is also a visiting professor at Zhongnan University. He has published two novels, twenty-one novellas, forty-two short stories, and seventy-five short-short stories. He has won a literary award for a novel, one for a novella, and one for a short story, including the prestigious Dingling Literary Award.

 

Chuan Sha (1952–) is a renowned Chinese-Canadian writer, poet, and playwright. He was born in Chongqing, Sichuan, China. He was the editor-in-chief of a literary magazine before he pursued his studies in the United Kingdom in 1991. He and his family immigrated to Canada in 1999. He was the Editor-in-Chief of Canada’s Poseidon Publishing House, Immigrants’ World (Journal), and Associate Editor-in-Chief of several newspapers including North America Weekly, Global Chinese Press (East Canada), and Easyca. Chuan Sha is presently the Director of the Chinese-Canadian Poets Association, Cultural Advisor to the Ontario Society of Chinese Education, the President and Vice-Director of Da Ya Culture International Inc., Co-Chair of the General Committee of the International Da Ya Feng Prize for Literature, Executive Chair of the Evaluation Committee of the International Da Ya Feng Prize for Literature, Executive Chair of the North American Pacific Art Global League, Editor-in-Chief of http://pacificartsinfo.com, and Member of the Screenplay Evaluation Committee of the Canada-China International Film Festival (CCIFF). He has a long list of publications, including novels, poetry anthologies, plays, literary reviews, among others. His major literary works include A Selection of Poems by Chuan Sha (2019, Bestview Scholars Publishing), The Shadowy Crowds (poetry in Chinese), Spring Night (poetry in Chinese and English), Sunlight (a novel), The Lady in the Blue-Flowered Qipao, (a novel), and Skirts Are Singing (poetry in a 3-Act Musical) as well as Sunlight (a 2-Act Dance, based on the novel with the same name).

 

Chung Ling (1945–) was born in Chongqing but grew up in Taiwan. She received her PhD in comparative literature from the University of Wisconsin. A National Literary Award winner, she has written more than three collections of stories, including Short-Short Stories by Chung Ling, or Miniature Short Stories of Chung Ling as originally introduced (Chung Ling ji duan pian), The Predestined Lovers (Sheng si yuan jia), and The Great Wheel of Life (Da lun hui). She has taught at New York State University, Hong Kong University, and National Sun Yat-sen University, and has been director of the Teaching Affairs Department of National Kaohsiung University in Taiwan.*

 

Cui Li (1981–), is a committee member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. He has published more than 1,000 short-short stories and other literary works in Beijing Literature, Tianjin Literature and other literary periodicals. He has won more than 100 literary prizes and awards for his short-short stories.

 

D

Dai Xi (1965–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He holds several important positions in literary organizations and is also a visiting professor at a college in Hunan. He has published twenty-five books of literary writings in total, including 700 short-short stories and 300 literary nonfiction pieces and poems. He has won six prizes and awards for his literary nonfiction, four for his poetry, and more than sixty for his short-short stories including the Gold Sparrow Award. He has also won the prestigious Bingxin Book Award.

 

F

Feng Chunsheng (1960–) lives and works in Inner Mongolia. He has published more than 400 short-short stories and has won five short-short story awards.

 

Feng Jicai, (1942–) born in Tianjin, is one of the best-known authors in China, having written many books, including novels, collections of short stories, and literary non-fiction. He is presently in charge of the compiling and editing of eight thousand volumes of Chinese folklore and folk literature, four volumes on each county in China. Besides holding two important literary positions, Mr. Feng also serves as member of the Standing Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference and as vice-chairman of the China Association for Promoting Democracy.*

 

G

Gan Bao (317[?]–420[?]), a talented literary man and a knowledgeable historian, author of Collection of Fairy Tales (Sou shen ji), during the Eastern Jin Dynasty (AD 317–420). His original works have long been lost. The version available today was put together by later editor-scholars. More than four hundred of his stories have been collected, published in twenty volumes.

 

Gao Jun (1962–) is a short-short story writer and critic based in Yinan, Shandong. He has published ten books of short-short stories and seven books of other literary works. He has won eighteen short-short story prizes and awards.

 

Gao Weixi (1933–2015) was a lifelong professional literary editor. Before his retirement he was the associate editor-in-chief of the prestigious Chinese bimonthly The Novelist and director of its editorial department. He authored many literary works, including a collection of short stories, Sailing in Love, and two collections of literary nonfiction, Irrational Passion and A Stormy Life. He spent most of retirement years in Toronto, Canada.

 

Gui Qianfu (1964–) was born in Luochuan, Shaanxi. He has published various literary works, totaling about six hundred pages.*

 

H

Han Ying (1939–) was born in Liaoyang, Liaoning. A lifelong government official in Guangdong, he has published more than one thousand literary pieces—poems, literary non-fiction, and short-short stories—including more than twenty books. He has won two prestigious national awards for his short-short stories.

 

He Baiyuan (1941–), National Second-Class Writer, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. Also known as Yuan Bai, he is the editor-in-chief of Foshan Wenyi (Foshan Literature and Art). He has published eleven books of literary works. He has authored twenty novellas, sixty short stories, and more than 700 short-short stories. Eighteen of his stories and other literary pieces have been included in textbooks and reading materials for elementary schools, high schools, colleges, and universities. He has won more than sixty prizes and awards for his short-short stories, including eight national awards. He has also won the prestigious Bingxin Book Award, among other honors. 

 

He Baoguo (1966–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published more than thirty books of literary works including three novels, a book of novellas, various collections of short-short stories, among other others.

 

He Kaiwen (1959–), an active short-short story writer, is the associate director of Jiangsu Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story. He has published more than 120 short-short stories, twenty short stories, and five novellas. He has won more than ten national and provincial awards for his short-short stories.

 

He Peng (1961–) was born in Qingshuihe County, Inner Mongolia. He is an invited committee member of the World’s Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story in Chinese. He has authored five books of short-short stories including Strange Disease, and has also published other works including three collections of literary reportage including Candle Light, and Green Romance. He has won ten awards, including a World’s Chinese Short-Short Story 40th Anniversary Contribution Award, among other honors.

 

Holmes, Lynn (1935–), a writer, copyeditor, and curriculum developer, is a retired English professor living in Toronto. He taught English literature and writing, among many other courses.

 

Hou Fashan (1966–), has published twenty-three books of short-short stories, six short stories, two novellas and a novel as well as literary non-fiction, totaling far more than 1,000 pieces. Seven of his short-short stories have been made into short movies. He is the Chair of Gongyi Writers’ Association, Henan, and also a visiting professor at the Zhengzhou Business College (郑州商学院).

 

Huang Cheng (1982–), whose official name is Liu Chunxian (刘春先), is a member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China and the associate editor-in-chief of the Short-Short Story Monthly Paper. He has published about fifty short-short stories and another fifty short stories. He has won more than ten short-short story awards.

 

Huang Fei (1946–), officially known as Li Huangfei, was born in Mianchi, Henan. He has written several collections of novellas and short stories. Some of his stories have been turned into TV movies. He works as a reporter for the Luoyang Daily. *

 

Huang Keting (1963–) is a member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China and Associate Chair of Yiwu Writers’ Association. Up till now, he has published the largest number of short-short science stories. He has published 600 short-short stories in eleven book and thirty-eight books of short stories. He has collected eighty-nine short-short story prizes and awards.

 

Huang Mojuan (1977–) is a member of the Fujian Writers’ Association, and also a member of the Literary Nonfiction Writers’ Society of China. Her literary works appear in China’s Art Paper, Selected Short-Short Stories, Anhui Literature, and Tianjin Literature, among other literary periodicals. She lives and works in the administrative office of the Dongshan County Hospital in Fujian.

 

Huang Rongcai (1970–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published more than 300 short-short stories including two books of such literary works, over forty short stories, twelve novellas published in book form, and two novels. 

 

Huang, Harry J. (1956–), PhD in linguistics and translation studies, is a citizen of Canada and a retired English professor from Seneca College in Toronto, who is also known as Freeman J. Wong. He has been translating and writing short-short stories since 1981 when he started teaching Chinese–English translation in Sun Yat-sen University, until 1989. After immigrating to Canada thirty years ago, he started writing short-short stories in English and has published three collections of them (1990, 1996, 2000) while he continued to translate Chinese short-short stories partly for his Canadian students. He taught the Chinese short-short story at Seneca College for more than fifteen years, among other English courses. He has authored five books of short-short stories—one in Chinese (written in the 1980s, yet to be published), three in English, and one in English and Chinese, but he is best known as a translation scholar and an expert Chinese–English translator who has translated more than 200 Chinese authors’ short-short stories into English, among others. He has been highly regarded by many writers and readers in Canada, mainland China, Hong Kong, Macao, among other places. He has another long list of publications including textbooks and journal articles, etc. He has won a book award for his first An Anthology of Chinese Short-Short Stories, a World’s Chinese Short-Short Story 40th Anniversary Contribution Award, and other honors. If time permits, he intends to translate more Chinese short-short stories with the intention to firmly establish the literary status of the short-short story in the world.

 

J

Ji Hongping (1963–) was born in Changchun, Jilin. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and is the associate editor-in-chief of Chunfeng Literature and Art (《春风文艺》) in Changchun. He has published a book of novellas and one of short stories. In addition, he has published thirty short-short stories and won a short-short story award. He is currently working on two novels.

 

Ji Rijian (1972–) is an award-winning short-short story writer, also known as Lian Gu and Shi San Li. He has published in various short-short story periodicals and newspapers. He also writes for a literary website on the internet.

 

Jiang Han (19??–) works for the Science and Technology Daily in China. He has published seven books of short stories and short-short stories including Kan Jian (《看见》), among other literary works.

Jiang Ye (1945–) is one of the oldest short-short story writers who has been writing for several decades. He is an associate Chair of Yunnan Short-Short Story Writers’ Salon. He has published 270 short-short stories, seven short stories, one collection of novellas, and a novel, among others. He has won two short-short story awards.

Jiang Zilong (1941–), one of the most prominent writers in contemporary China, has published more than seventy literary works, of which Factory Director Qiao Starting His Job was turned into a popular movie loved by viewers throughout China.*

 

Jin Bo (1964–) is a professional writer based in Xinxian County, Henan. He has published twenty-six books, twelve of which were short-short stories. He has also published fifty-six short stories, eighteen novellas, and five novels, among others. He has won thirty-two short-short story prizes and awards and three short story awards.

 

Jin Ziwei (1962–) is a well-known contemporary literary writer who has a long list of publications with many literary awards. He has published fifteen novels, over 100 novellas including eight collections, over eighty short stories, and 120 short-short stories. In book form, besides the novels, he has published two collections of short-short stories and eight of novellas and short stories combined. He has won twenty literary awards across the four types of fiction—the novel, novella, short story, and short-short story, including a prestigious China’s Red Eagle Writers’ Award and a gold award for the short-short story. The numbers in category are ten for his short-short stories, eight for his short stories, five for his novellas and one for a novel.

 

L

Lan Yue (1972–), who is officially known as Chen Xuefang (陈雪芳), was born in Suzhou, Jiangsu. She is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. She is the chief editor for the periodical Huge World of the Short-Short Story published by Da Tang Association of Literary Writers and Artists in Shaanxi. She has published three books of short-short stories, among other literary writings.

 

Li Jingwen (1961–), a National Class 1 Writer, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and a committee member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. He lives and works in Jiangdu, Jiangsu. He has published two novels including Kan Tian (《看天》), one collection of novellas, one of short stories and one of short-short stories. He has won an award for a novella, one for a short story and sixteen for his short-short stories.

 

Li Yongkang (1964–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He mostly writes short-short fiction in his free time. He resides in Wenjiang, Sichuan. Besides five short stories, he has published two books of short-short stories. He has won twenty prizes and awards for his short-short stories.

 

Li Yongsheng (1968–), was born in Laishui, Hebei. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. His writings have appeared in Selected Fiction (《小说选刊》), Beijing Literature and nearly 100 other literary periodicals. He has published five books of short-short stories and twenty short stories, winning more than ten short-short story awards.

 

Li Yue (1968–) lives and works in Suqian, Jiangsu. He is the editor-in-chief of two Chinese magazines, one of which is Shao Nian Zuo Jia (Children’s Writers). He has published more than 500 literary pieces of writing including over fifty stories, thirty of which are short-short stories. He has won more than twenty literary prizes and awards.

 

Liang Gang (1958–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of Shanghai. He mostly writes short-short stories and poetry. Besides a novel, three novellas and eighteen short stories, he has published more than 200 short-short stories, which have appeared in more than 100 literary periodicals and newspapers

 

Lin Rongzhi (1958–) was born in Zhanjiang, Guangdong. Winner of several national awards for fine fiction and non-fiction, he has written seven collections of short stories and literary non-fiction.*

 

Lin Ruqiu (1947–) was born in Minqing, Fujian. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published three collections of short and short-short stories, a book of literary non-fiction, and one of literary critiques. He was the associate editor-in-chief of Fujian Literature before retirement. He is now a lecturer at Fujian University for Seniors.

Lin Tingguang (1978–), whose pseudonyms are Lu He (鹿禾) and Wei Wei You Zhang (维维有章), holds an MBA. He works for the communication department of the government of Sanshui, Guangdong. He is a freelance writer and has published more than 800 short-short stories and fifty short stories. He has won twenty short-short story prizes and awards.

 

Lin Weisheng (1967–), PhD (in comparative literature), is a Guangzhou-based university professor. Also known as Linser, he used to write short stories and translate as well. He has a long list of publications with his first book published in his early twenties. He has taught himself in practically the same way as his ancient Chinese counterparts did. Through self-study, he first earned a college diploma, then a BA degree, leading to an MA degree, and then a PhD, until he became a full professor in Guangdong University for Foreign Studies.

 

Lin Xiaopeng (1986–), whose pseudonym is Ku Shu (酷暑), was born in Jieyang, Guangdong. He is a member of the Guangzhou Writers’ Association and also a committee member of the Guangzhou Young Writers’ Association. He has published a novel, three novellas, six short stories, and twenty-two short-short stories. He has also published a collection of literary nonfiction entitled Hui Sheng (Echoes).

 

Lin Yongjie (19??–) is a member of the Dezhou Writers’ Association in Shandong. She writes stories, poetry, etc. Her works have been published in print and broadcast on the internet as well.

 

Lin Yueqi (1969–) born in Fujian, is a fiction writer who has won more than ten literary awards at the provincial and national levels, among others. He has published five novels including Liang Di Shi (Two Emperors’ Teacher), four books of short-short stories as well as internet fiction, among others.

 

Ling Dingnian (1951–) is currently the Chair of the World’s Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story in Chinese. He is one of the most prolific short-short story writers in China and is known throughout the country and among Chinese short-short story writers outside of China. He has authored more than twenty books of short-short stories, three of short stories and a novella, among others, totaling thirty collections. He has also edited and published dozens of books of short-short stories for his peers. He has collected more than 320 literary prizes and awards in total. He is one of the few short-short story writers who also writes about short-short story writing techniques and has often been giving lectures to students in different schools.

 

Ling Junyang (1987–) has won various literary awards for his Chinese short-short stories, science fiction, and literary nonfiction. He has published a historical novel, a literary biography, a collection of literary nonfiction, and a collection of novellas and short stories.

 

Ling Yan (19??–), was born in Hong Kong but grew up in Macao. He is the Chair of Macao Writers’ Association and was the Founding Chair of the World’s Chinese Writers’ Association. He used to be an elementary school teacher and high school teacher. Then he became the editor-in-chief of a Hong Kong press. A diligent writer, he has authored six books of children’s fiction, one of which is on the list of the “Ten Best Hong Kong Books.” Following the 2017 release of his new book Zuo Ye Xing Chen (Last Night’s Stars), he has been writing another book, which will unlikely be the last.

 

Liu Fengzhen (1963–), winner of China’s National Short Literary Works Contest, has published dozens of short stories and short-short stories. She has also co-edited A Collection of Poems by North Shaanxi Women Poets.*

 

Liu Gong (1963–) is the editor-in-chief of a literary magazine. A member of the Writers’ Association of China, he is an established fiction writer who has published widely. His novel Ai Hao Tong (Love Is Painful) won a literary award in Shaanxi, and his collection of short stories and another collection of short-short stories were shortlisted for the prestigious Lu Xun Literary Award. Up till now, he has authored 289 short-short stories, eighteen short stories, three novellas, and three novels. He has won twenty-eight literary awards for his short-short stories, two for his short stories and one for a novel. He has also edited and published several anthologies of short-short stories. Two of his short-short stories have been made into short movies, one of which won an award at the 6th Asian Short Movies Festival.

Liu Guangrong (1964–) lives and works in Xin Yi, Guangdong. He has published more than seventy short-short stories in a collection entitled Liu Guangrong Xiao Shuo Ji (Stories by Liu Guangrong).

Liu Guofang (1957–) was born in Linchuan, Jiangxi. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. Having won a long list of literary awards, he has published more than 2,600 short-short stories, many of which have been have been included in textbooks and anthologies. Some of them have been translated into foreign languages.

 

Liu Haitao (1955–) was born in Zhanjiang, Guangdong. He is a short-short story theorist, and also a member of the Chinese Writers’ Association. He is a special visiting professor at Hunan Science and Technology College. He has published more than two hundred research essays in various journals inside and outside of China. He is one of the scholars who started to study the Chinese short-short story in the 1980s and was also among the first to publish theoretical essays, including a monograph entitled The Chinese Short-Short Story: Theory and Writing Techniques. He has devoted much of his time to theoretical research on the short-short story, the science of writing and the study of overseas Chinese literature.

 

Liu, Hong (19??–) is a Canadian freelance translator. He was an Associate Professor of English in Guangxi Normal University in Guilin, China. He also taught Chinese (1995–1999) at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. His Chinese-English translation of Untitled Lyrics, a poetry anthology by Mr. Zhanqiu Liu, was published in 1994 by Hong Kong Literary Press. Mr. Liu lives in Ontario, Canada with his wife and daughter.

 

Liu Hongzhong (1973–) was born in Qingyun, Shandong. He is a member of Shandong Literary Nonfiction Writers’ Association and also a member of Dezhou Writers’ Association. Currently, he is the Chair of the Writers’ Association of Qingyun County, Shandong. Besides literary nonfiction, he writes short-short stories as well as short stories.

 

Liu Jushang (1941–), whose father was from Meixian, Guangdong, was born in Macao. He was the former Chair of Zhongshan Writers’ Association, Guangdong, and the chief executive director of the Xiangshan Daily. He has authored thirty-six books including a collection of stories, Yue Wei (Offside), another book of literary works entitled Wo Xin Zhong De Di Ping Xian (The Horizon in My Heart), and thirty-four other titles. He has won three short-short story awards. He has been living in Macao since retirement.

 

Liu Liqin (1966–) started his literary writing in the 1990s. He has published more than one hundred stories in different literary periodicals. He works for the Cultural Center of Zhenan County, Shaanxi.*

Liu Liying (1960–) is a full-time writer. National short-short story award winner, she has published 120 short-short stories and forty other literary pieces, including novellas and short stories.*

 

Liu Shiyi (1990–), whose official name is Wang Yanhu (王彦虎), was born in Jincheng in the Northwest of China. He holds a Master’s in Chemistry from Sun Yet-sen University in Guangzhou and has started working. He won the first prize of an all-China writing contest when he was in high school. Up till now, he has published a novel and a number of short-short stories. He has won a short-short story award. Presently, he is working on another novel, mostly in his free time. According to what he has said, this is just the beginning of his writing career.

 

Liu Wanli (19??–) was born in Hanyin, Shaanxi. Winner of two national short-short story contests, he has published more than three hundred stories, including short-short stories, short stories, and novellas. He works for a newspaper in Shaanxi.*

 

Liu Wei (1960–) lives and works in Benxi, Liaoning. He has published four collections of prose, many short-short stories, and poems, among others.*

Liu Yiqing (403–444) was the author of many works, including A Collection of Tales of the Other World (You ming lu). This work, said to contain thirty (or twenty) volumes in its original form, was lost in the late fifth century, or in the Sui Dynasty (581–618). More than two hundred stories are still available, many of which are sketches, though some are fairly complete story-lines. Though the majority are ghost stories, some originated in folk tales. His writing style significantly influenced many writers in the later generations.

Liu Yongfei (1976–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published five books of short-short stories including Ci Ke (Assassin). He has won the first prize of the 7th and 17th national short-short story annual nomination awards.

Long Ganghua (19??–), Professor and Dean of the School of Literature, Shaoyang College, Hunan, has studied the Chinese short-short story for many years and has conducted in-depth research in the field.

Lu Fuhong (1960–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. An award-winning writer, he has published twelve books of short-short stories, among other literary works.

Luo Binlu (19??–), has dual citizenship from Hong Kong, China and Singapore. A senior writer, he is presently enjoying his retirement in Singapore.

M

Ma Baoshan (1948–) is an author of the Mongolian nationality but was born in Fuxin, Liaoning. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He started writing fiction around the age of thirty and has published two novels, ten novellas, more than twenty short stories, and over 200 short-short stories. He has won more than six short-short story awards at the national or provincial level, including the precious Gold Sparrow Award.

Ma Duangang (1970–) was born in Baotou, Inner Mongolia. He writes mostly fiction and has published a collection of novellas entitled Sunshine in the Afternoon. He works as an editor for a literary magazine in Inner Mongolia.*

Ma Fengchao (1935–) was born in Sanmenxia, Henan. He once worked as the associate editor-in-chief of the Sanmenxia Daily. A literary award winner, he has published short stories and reportage, totaling almost one hundred items.*

Ma Shaoxian (1938–), lifelong literary editor and writer, has published many literary essays as well as stories, including a book of literary non-fiction entitled Heartfelt Love (Ai zai xin zhong) and a biography which was written after she had suffered a severe stroke that disabled half of her body including her right hand and leg. A right-handed person, while suffering from constant pain every day, she learned to use her left hand. She hand-wrote her last Chinese book of 272 pages one character at a time, which was published in February 2019. She is also an excellent self-taught photographer.

 

Ma Xinting (1967–) is a writer based in Zibo, Shandong. He has published twelve books of short-short stories and has won more than 100 prizes and awards for his short-short stories including one from the “2nd World’s Chinese Short-Short Story Contest.”

Mei Fengyan (1964–) was born in Wujin, Jiangsu. She is a member of the Suzhou Writers’ Association. She has published about 200 short-short stories in various literary periodicals and anthologies. She has won five short-short story awards.

 

Meng Meng (1948–) was born in Xianyang, Shaanxi. Winner of more than ten municipal and provincial awards, he has written four books and other works, including two novels, a collection of novellas and short stories and two collections of literary non-fiction as well as three scenarios.*

Miao Yipeng (1954–) was born in Macheng, Hubei. He has published a book of short-short stories entitled Mu Niu Shao Nian (A Buffalo Boy), two books of short stories including Liu Yue Liu (Sixth Day of the Sixth Lunar Month), and a collection of novellas—Yao Wang Tian Tang (Watching Paradise from Afar). He has won a literary award for his novellas, two awards for his short stories, and twelve for his short-short stories.

Mo Bai (1956–), born in Huaiyang, Henan, is a well-known fiction writer and playwright who started writing in 1984. He has published a trilogy of novels and three collections of novellas and short stories, four collections of short-short stories, another forty novellas and over ninety short stories, among others. He has won multiple short-short story awards, including the sixth Gold Sparrow Award.

N

Zhen (1964–) is the pseudonym for Zhang Ying (张颖). She is a member of the Writers’ Association of China, based in Shenyang. She has published a novel, more than forty novellas, over 100 short stories, and more than thirty short-short stories. She has won two awards for her novellas and three for her short stories, including the prestigious China’s Book Award. She also writes literary nonfiction and critiques.

 

P

Peng Sike (1930–), writer, editor and one-time journalist, has written many publications, including a novel entitled Battles in Yihetala and a collection of short stories and novellas, The Golden Mt. Xingan. He has won many literary awards.*

Price, Robert (19??–), PhD, Ontario-based professor of English, has authored books and essays of various types. He is a highly respected professor who has taught reading, writing, the short story, and other college English subjects. A humorist who cheers up everyone around him, he is not only a role model for his students, but also a great mentor to his young colleagues. His professionalism, wisdom, high moral standards, and love for others influence students, colleagues, and friends far more than a book does.

Pu Songling (1640–1715) was born in Zichuan, or today’s Zibo, Shandong. For the greater part of his life, he was an impoverished teacher, but he published many works, including fiction, poems and books for the undereducated public. His masterpiece is A Collection of Weird Stories (Liao zhai zhi yi), which has been claimed to be a monumental book of short-short stories full of literary imagination. Some critics believe it is not only an important book of Chinese short stories, but also one that belongs to world literature. “Mr. Shen” is an average story taken from this book.

R

Rivera, Patria (19??–) is a well-known Canadian poet, writer, and editor. She has published four poetry anthologies and two chapbooks, including Puti/White (2005), The Bride Anthology (2007), BE, and The Time Between (2018), among other literary works. Her first poetry collection, Puti/White, was a finalist for the Canadian Trillium Book Award for Poetry. She is an award winner of the Eric Hill Poetic Excellence Competition (2005) held by QWERTY, a literary journal published by the English Department of the University of New Brunswick and also a co-recipient of the 2007 Filipino Global Literary Award for Poetry, and many other literary honors. Her poetry is featured in Oxford University Press’s Perspectives in Ideology, and in Elana Wolff’s Implicate me: Short Essays on Reading Contemporary Poems. She has received fellowships from the Writers’ Union of Canada, the Banff Centre for the Arts, the Hawthornden Castle International Retreat for Writers in Scotland, and the Nieman Center for Journalism at Harvard University. She lives with her family in East Toronto.

 

Ru Rongxing (1958–) was born in Jiaxing, Zhejiang. He is a committee member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. Winner of forty literary awards, he has, since 1982, published more than one thousand short-short stories and critiques, including twelve collections of short-short fiction.

S

 

Shao Baojian (1946–), born in Huzhou, Zhejiang, is an award-winning writer. He has written two collections of short-short stories. He works for the Huzhou Daily in Zhejiang.*

 

Shao Huoyan (1968–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of Hubei and the associate Chair of Tuanfeng County Writers’ Association. He has published more than 1,200 short-short stories including those in the four selections that have been released. He has also published twenty short stories and another 200 pieces of literary nonfiction. He has received eighty prizes and awards including many first prizes.

 

Shen Hong (1959–) was born in Huzhou, Zhejiang. He is an editor and writer. He has published more than eight hundred short-short stories including three collections of such literary pieces. He has won many literary honors, including the Zhengzhou Short-Short Story Writers’ Society Fine Collection Award for his book, Getting Out of the Desert

 

Shen Ping (1955–) is a Huizhou-based writer. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and the Chair of Huizhou Short-Short Story Writers’ Association. He is also an invited copy-editor of the literary magazine Xiao Shuo Xuan Kan (Selected Fiction). He has published eighteen books of novellas, short stories and short-short stories. The category breakdown is 1,100 short-short stories, eighty short stories, twenty-six novellas, and a novel. He has won a long list of prizes and awards which include sixty-five for his short-short stories and three for his short stories.

 

Shen Shaoxiong (1962–) whose pen name is Si Ke (斯克) is a police officer in his home city, Shantou. He is a member of the Calligraphers’ Association of China, a member of the Writers’ Association of Shantou, and a member of Shantou’s Tea Culture Society. He has been in the police force for more than thirty years and has been cited for his meritorious service and has also received merit medals. He has been writing since 1983 and has published five books: (1) Shen Shaoxiong Wen Ji (Literary Writings by Shen Shaoxiong), (2) Shen Shaoxiong Xiao Shuo Ji (Stories by Shen Shaoxiong), (3) Shen Shaoxiong San Wen Ji (Literary Nonfiction by Shen Shaoxiong), (4) Shen Shaoxiong Shi Ji (Poetry by Shen Shaoxiong), and (5) Shen Shaoxiong Shu Fa Ji (Calligraphic Art Works by Shen Shaoxiong).

 

Shen Zulian (1951–), also known by his pseudonym Shen Gong (申弓), is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He is the Chair of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of Guangxi. He has published fifteen books of short-short stories, including Third Day of the Honeymoon, Men’s Scenery, and 108 Short-Short Stories by Shen Zulian, among others. He has won over 100 prizes and awards including the most prestigious Gold Sparrow Award at the national level and the highest bronze award from the government of Guangxi Province.

Shi Lei (1962–) whose official name is Chen Bingzhen (陈炳镇) lives and works in Shanwei, Guangdong. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and also a committee member of the Writers’ Association of Guangdong. He has published eight novels, seven books of novellas and short stories combined, and four books of short-short stories. A category breakdown is thirty-six novellas, more than eighty short stories and 700 short-short stories, besides the novels. He has won five awards for his novels, seven for his novellas, more than twenty for his short stories, and about 100 for his short-short stories.

Shu, Yunzhong (舒允中, B.A. M.A. Beijing Normal University; Ph.D. Columbia University) is a professor of Chinese and Chair of the Department of Classical, Middle Eastern and Asian Languages and Cultures at Queens College, the City University of New York. His research is focused on modern Chinese fiction. He has published Buglers on the Home Front: The Wartime Practice of the Qiyue School and articles in English and Chinese on a wide range of topics in modern and contemporary Chinese literature, including the influence of Zou Rong and Zhang Taiyan on Mao Zedong, late Qing fiction, A Ying’s fiction about revolution, contemporary fiction about military life, contemporary historical fiction, experimental fiction, and works by Yu Dafu, Yang Mo, Li Ruqing, Wang Shuo, Li Rui, Chen Zhongshi, Zhou Meisen, Yan Geling, Zhang Ping and Li Peifu. He has also published English translations of works by the contemporary literary critic Liu Zaifu.

 

Shui Yue (19??–), pseudonym of Lin Huixian (林慧嫺), has published two books of literary nonfiction and a novel, among other literary works. She has won the Macao Novella Award and two other awards for literary nonfiction.

Si Yusheng (1956–) is the Associate Chair of Henan Short-Short Story Writers’ Society. Besides the previous collections, he has published seven books of short-short stories since 2015, among other literary pieces.            

 

Strength, Will, a college professor, has published a great number of education-related articles and books. He loves children and believes the heaviest human loss is missing the opportunity to educate one’s own children when they are so educatable. His early-childhood series An Easy Way to Teach the Alphabet, An Easy Way to Tell Bedtime Stories, and An Easy Way to Teach Mathematics is based on his own success in educating his three children, who have all grown up and have been educated or are still receiving education in prestigious universities. Through these easy-to-use booklets he intends to help parents lay a solid academic foundation for their children at the earliest age possible at the minimal cost of a few hamburgers.

 

Sun Chunping (1950–), who belongs to the Manchu nationality, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He used to be a “zhi qing” (educated youth sent to work in the fields including mountainous areas) and a railroad worker. He is now the Chair of the Federation of Literary Writers and Artists of Shenyang and also Associate Chair of the Writers’ Association of Liaoning. He has published five novels, sixty novellas, 100 short stories and five books comprising 200 short-short stories. He has won an award for a novel, ten awards for his novellas, eight for his short stories, and five for his short-short stories.

 

Sun Fangyou (1950–2013), claimed by critics and readers to be one of the best, was a master short-short story writer whose writing techniques have influenced many young short-short fiction writers in China, especially those who write about the jiang hu shi jie (the underworld society). He started writing short-short stories in 1978 and was best known for his Chenzhou (a fictitious city) series. He had left dozens of books of short-short fiction including the well-known collections Women Bandits and Assassin. By 2004, he had already won sixty short-short story prizes and awards including top national honors. He became a full-time writer in 2002 and started to write longer pieces of fiction as well.

 

Sun Shuyuan (1948–) was born in Chao’an County, Guangdong Province. He has worked in the public health sector for about forty years, and has been writing since 1981. Winner of three prestigious literary awards in Shantou City, he has published a long list of literary works including four novels, two collections of novellas and short stories, among other works.

 

T

Tan Jianqiao (19??–), a cardiologist in Kiang Wu Hospital, loves history and literature and enjoys writing after work. He has published six books, among other works, and has won a Macao Literature Award and a Macao Poetry Award.

Tao Qian (365–427) is believed to be the author of Another Collection of Fairy Tales (Sou shen hou ji), despite all doubts raised. This work, which consists of ten volumes, by its name appears to be the continuation of Gan Bao’s Collection of Fairy Tales (Sou shen ji). An outstanding poet in Chinese literature, Tao Qian did not care for fame or money and had a free sexual life. After being an official for eighty days, he quit his job because of his resentment of government corruption and hypocrisy, and resumed a simple life in his home village.

 

Tao Ran (1943–2019) born in Bandung, Indonesia, was the editor-in-chief of Hong Kong Literary Press. By 2004 he had published twenty-two books, including three novels, eight collections of literary non-fiction, two of short-short stories, and many novellas and short stories, as well as poems. In 2000, Professor Cao Huimin of Beijing University published a book entitled Reading Tao Ran: Essays on Tao Ran’s Literary Works.

 

Teng Gang, (1962–) first-prize winner of a Chinese short-short story contest, has written Teng Gang’s Short-Short Stories, among others. He is one of the few Chinese short fiction writers who also explores sex-related topics.*

 

W

Wan Qian (1959–) is the pseudonym of Shen Ming (沈明). He is a member of Suzhou Writers’ Association. He has published 160 short-short stories in various provincial and national literary periodicals including Ren Min Wen Xue (People’s Literature), Zhong Guo Zuo Jia (China’s Authors), and Shou Huo (Harvests), among others. He has won many literary awards—he was already a three-time national short-short story contest winner back in 2005 when this translator’s first anthology of Chinese short-short stories was published.

 

Wang Jia (317[?]–420[?]) is believed to have lived somewhere between AD 317 and 420. His story included here is taken from his Collection of Anecdotes (Shi yi ji), which consists of ten volumes, most of which record stories about the emperors from ancient times up until the fourth century.

 

Wang Juanrong (19??–) is a native of Zhenjiang, Jiangsu. She is a member of the Writers’ Association of China, the Literary Nonfiction Writers’ Association, and the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. Since 1981, she has published novels, novellas, and short stories, including a collection of short-short stories, among other literary works. She has won more than 30 literary prizes and awards.

 

Wang Kuishan (1946–2012) was born in Queshan, Henan. A three-time winner of national short-short story contests, he started to publish literary works in 1981, including a collection of short-short stories entitled Wang Kuishan’s Short-Short Stories, among others.

 

Wang Peijing (1963–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and the Chair of Beijing Short-Short Story Writers’ Salon. Besides a novel and six novellas, he has published fifty short stories and 1,500 short-short stories. Altogether he has published twenty books of literary works and won 108 short-short story prizes and awards, sixteen for his short stories and one award for a novella.

 

Wang Wengang (1977–), originally known as Wang Qianli (王千里), was born in Xuzhou, Jiangsu. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of Jiangsu, a committee member of Xuzhou Writers’ Association, and also a committee member of Jiangsu Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story. He has published more than 400 short-short stories and literary essays. He has authored three collections of short stories and has won three awards for his short-short stories and two for his short stories.

 

Wang Xiaoqian (1964–), who was born in Fushun, Sichuan, holds a Master’s in Economics. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has authored the first novel of his to-be trilogy entitled Jiu Hua (Drunk Talk) and ten other books including five collections of short-short stories, one of which is Si Ceng Xiang Shi De Dong Tian (A Winter That Looks Familiar). He also writes literary nonfiction and reportage. He has coauthored a TV series script that has been produced and broadcast. He has won fifty short-short story prizes and awards, including the prestigious Bingxin Children’s Book Award.

 

Wang Xinghai (1959–) was born in Yucheng, Shandong. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of Shandong, a committee member of the Literary Nonfiction Writers’ Association of Shandong, and Chair of Yucheng Writers’ Association. Besides a novel and two novellas, he has published 100 short-short stories and nine short stories. He has won an award for a novella, three for his short stories, and five for his short-short stories.

 

Wei Er (19??–), pseudonym of Yang Yinghong (楊穎虹), has won the Macao Literary Award for the category of literary nonfiction, fiction and plays. Carrying a long list of academic and literary titles, she is an active writer and columnist for a newspaper and a periodical in Macao.

 

Wong, Freeman J., pseudonym of Harry J Huang.

 

Wong, Tomaz Ho Wai (1981–) was born and grew up in Hong Kong. He is a freelance writer who has published two books entitled The Pastoral Note in 2016 and The Dead in 2018. His story “Chang Mao” (“Long Hair”) won the Excellent-Story Prize of the “Baosen Bei Quan Guo Shan Xiao Shuo Zheng Wen Bi Sai,” or the Baosen-Cup All-China Flash Fiction Contest, and was subsequently published in China’s Flash Fiction Writers’ Forum in August 2017.

 

Wu Jinliang (1955–), winner of several literary awards, has written five books and many stories, including a collection of short stories, a literary biography, two novels and a collection of short-short stories entitled Wu Jinliang’s Short-Short Stories. Some of his works have been turned into movies or TV movies.*

Wu Wanfu (1968–), born in Guanshan County, Henan, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published six books of short-short stories, one collection of short stories and one of novellas. He also writes poetry and literary nonfiction. He has won more than fifty literary prizes and awards including the Henan Literary Award, Feitian Fiction Award, and People’s Literature’s Literary Nonfiction Award.

 

X

Xia Xueqin (1963–) started to write in 1987. A winner of the first National Short-Short Story Contest (2001) in China, she has published in many literary periodicals and newspapers. She works for a district cultural center in Hangzhou.

 

Xiang Yuting (1960–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has authored a trilogy of novels, one of which has won an award. The most prestigious Renmin Wenxue Chubanshe (People’s Literature Press) has published a collection comprising twenty volumes including his literary works, the title of which is Yan He Jiu Shi (《盐河旧事》). He has also published many short-short stories. He won the 16th all-China short-short first prize (2017), among other prestigious literary prizes and awards.

 

Xiao Jianguo (1970–) is the Chair of Huicheng District Writers’ Association of Huizhou. He has been writing short-short stories for more than twenty years and has published over 500 literary pieces. Besides a novel and a book of short stories, he has published two books of short-short stories, one of which, Da Xue Na Nian (The Heavy Snowfall That Year), has won multiple awards in various competitions. In total, he has won more than ten awards for his short-short stories and three for his short stories.

 

Xie Zhiqiang (1954–) is a first-prize short fiction winner with a long list of publications. He has published a collection of short-short stories entitled War Between Shadows.*

 

Xing Ke (1937–), originally known as Xing Guoxi, was born in Qixia, Shandong. Also published under the pseudonyms Ke Ren and Zhu Xinkang, he used to work as an editor, then as associate editor-in-chief and later editor-in-chief for a literary magazine in Zhengzhou until retirement. Since 1958, he has published more than five hundred literary items, including novellas, short stories, short-short stories, poems and critiques. He has written four books including A Selection of Xing Ke’s Short-Short Stories. He has collected more than twenty literary awards at the local and national levels.*

 

Xing Qingjie (1970–), born in Yucheng, Shandong, is a member the Writers’ Association of China and a professional writer. He is the Chair of Dezhou Writers’ Association and is also a visiting professor at Dezhou College. He has published twenty-three books of literary works including fifteen books of short-short stories, seven of short stories, and a book of novellas. He has won more than forty literary prizes and awards, including a provincial TV broadcast award and a number of first prizes of national short-short story contests.

 

Xiu Shi (1954–), ex-Chair of Hong Kong Fiction Writers’ Association, is a poet, literary nonfiction writer, fiction writer, and critic. He has authored over 100 short-short stories, more than ten short stories, and a novella, and has published two books of short-short stories entitled Mou Ge Xiu Si Dun Nu Zi (A Certain Woman in Houston) and Hu Die Bu Zuo Meng (Butterflies Do Not Dream). He has also edited and published a book of short stories written by Hong Kong writers. He has won two literary awards for his short-short stories.

 

Xiu Xiangming (1958–) was born in Jimo, Shandong. Winner of two important national short-short story contests—one at the national level and one at the international level—he has published many short-short stories, winning several literary awards.*

 

Xu Dong (1975–) was born in Shangdong but lives and works in Shenzhen. He has published more than ten books of fiction, including Bian Hu Ji (《变虎记》), Wo Men (《我们》), Ou Zhu De Yuan Fang (《欧珠的远方》) and Jiu Ai Yu Hui Yi (《旧爱与回忆》). He has won the Guangdong Lu Xun Literary Award.

 

Xu Guojiang (1937–) was born in Jiangdu, Jiangsu. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of Jiangsu. He has published more than 1,200 short-short stories including those in his eight books of short-short fiction. He has also published five short stories and more than 200 poems. Also on his publication list are two books of novellas and two of poetry. He has won twenty awards in total, including one for each of his eight collections of short-short stories and two for his anthologies of poetry.

Xu Huifen (1952), a Shanghai-based writer, is a committee member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. She has published six collections of short-short stories, among others. She has won seven prestigious literary awards.

 

Xu Junquan (1952–), born in Burma, is a Macao resident whose parents and grandparents were Chinese citizens from Taishan, Guangdong. He has authored four books of short-short stories and edited and published more than ten other books of literary works. He has won 210 literary prizes and awards, ten of which were for his short-short stories.

Xu Shewen (1966–) is a short-short story writer who writes about events in government offices. He has been writing for thirty years and has published five books of short-short stories. He has won thirty awards for his literary works including the Zijinshan Literary Award, which is the highest award in the province of Jiangsu.

Xu Xiaoming (1972–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. She is the well-known writer who holds a senior title and writes for a newspaper and TV channel in Jieyang, Guangdong. She has authored several important publications including two books of literary nonfiction, a collection of poetry and the well-known transcribed story entitled Wo He Wo De Kang Zhan—Chao Shan Kang Zhan Lao Bing Kou Shu Shi Lu (Me and My Fight Against the Foreign Invaders: An Oral Account by a Veteran Soldier in Chaoshan). She has won various literary awards, among other honors.

Xu Xijun (1960–) was born in Guanyun, Jiangsu. He is the associate editor-in-chief of the Journal of Huaihai Polytechnic College and an adjunct professor at China University of Mining and Technology. He is also a writer and literary critic. Besides three important monographs, he has published over two thousand pages of literary works, including three books of short-short stories and literary nonfiction, among others. He has won more than fifty prizes and awards including literary awards and research awards.

 

Xu Xing (1923–2006) was born in Yixian County, Liaoning. He wrote more than ten books, including a collection of poems entitled Hard Journey, and two collections of stories, The Fourth Maple Leaf and Wild Roses.

 

Y

Ya Hua (1965–) is a writer who lives and works in Guangdong. She is a member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. She has published thirty-four short-short stories, six short stories and three novellas. Her stories appear in the mainstream media in China and also in the Chinese newspapers and magazines in Japan, Australia, and Thailand. Besides winning an award for her novella and one for a short story, she has won five short-short story awards.

 

Yan Chungou (1948–), Hong Kong resident and editor working for Cosmos Books, has also published under three pseudonyms: Mu Yi, Si Ren, and Leng Ying. He has won two literary awards in Hong Kong and one in Taiwan. He writes mostly literary non-fiction and short stories, and has published three collections of short stories, including Red and Green Lights, one of non-fiction, and a literary scenario entitled Bloody Rain.*

 

Yan Xiaoge (1968–) was born in Xihua, Henan. Teaching as a profession, he started to publish short-short stories in 1995 and has won several prizes and awards.*

Yang Xiaomin, (19??–) editor-in-chief of the prestigious monthly Selected Short-Short Stories, has edited many collections of short-short stories, including A Collection of the Prize Winners of the Past 15 Years: From the Monthly Selected Short-Short Stories. He also writes short-short stories.*

Yao Chaowen (1966–), PhD, is a professor and subject leader in the Chinese Department, School of Education, Foshan College of Science and Technology. He is also an adjunt professor at Zhongshan University, and an invited foreign professor at Kokugakuin University in Japan. He is also a short-short story writer and holds a number of titles at literary organizations. He is a committee member and also the director of the Academic Department of the World’s Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story in Chinese.

 

Ye Chunsheng (19??–) is the author of many works, including Tales About Canton and A Collection of Guangdong and Hainan Customs. He is a Chinese professor and folklorist supervising PhD candidates in Sun Yat-sen University, well known for his profound knowledge of southern Chinese culture and customs.*

 

Ye Dachun (1956–) was born in Wuhan, Hubei. He has written a novel, a collection of short stories, a collection of literary non-fiction and one of short-short stories, among others, totaling five thousand pages. He is a three-time winner of the Chinese Short-Short Story Contest.*

 

Ye Qingcheng (19??–), also known as Hu Qingzhi, lives and works in Wuhan, Hubei. A short-short story prize winner, she has authored six collections of literary non-fiction and three collections of stories.*

 

Ye Yufei (1963–) is the pen name of Xu Xiao Fei (徐小非) who was born in Heping, Guangdong but lives and works in Shenzhen. She is a member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China, and a member of two other literary writers’ societies. She is an associate editor-in-chief for a literary magazine. She has published in various periodicals and newspapers with two books of short-short stories in her possession. Some of her short-short stories have been broadcast by the Central Broadcasting Station.

 

Yi De Er Fu (1944–), originally known as Ye Fu, started his literary career in 1972, writing many books, including a collection of short-short stories entitled Classified Reference Open to the Public, two of short stories, Springing Out and Stories by Yi De Er Fu, and one of novellas, Whose Fault. He has published many other works, such as short plays, TV scripts and literary non-fiction, as well as a book of his own calligraphy. He has collected nearly forty municipal, provincial and national literary awards. He has worked as an editor for several literary series.*

 

Yin Quansheng (1955–), well-known short-short story writer, was born in Neixiang, Henan. He has written a collection of short stories and four collections of short-short stories.*

 

Yin Yun (471–531) was the author of the thirty-volume Stories, which have been lost. His stories were popular tales of his time, with a distinct feature of folklore. “Fighting a Tiger” is one of those that remain. As recorded, Yin was “a man who doesn’t care about particulars, but well read and diligent at learning.”

You Ma’er (19??–) lives and works in Hong Kong. He has published short stories, among other literary works.

 

Yu Rui (19??–), officially known as Fang Yurui, was born in Liu’an, Anhui. A multiple short-short story prize winner, he has published more than one hundred short-short stories, including a collection. He works for a museum as director and associate researcher.*

 

Yu Xiurong (1975–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. She has published many literary works and won a number of literary awards. Her publications include a novel entitled Feng Shou (《丰收》,Harvest), a book of literary nonfiction, a book of novellas and one of short stories, as well as eighteen short-short stories. She has won an award for her literary nonfiction and two awards for her short stories.

 

Yuan Bingfa (1960–) lives and works in Harbin, Heilongjiang. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and a committee member of the Writers’ Association of Heilongjiang. His publications include seven books of short-short stories and eight short stories. He started writing in 1984 and has been publishing in dozens of prestigious literary periodicals. Many of his stories have been included in various anthologies and some have been turned into short movies and aired on TV in China. He has won twelve short-short story awards and a short story award.

 

Yuan Liangcai (1966–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of Anhui. He has published three plays, one of which has been performed on the stage and the other two have been turned into short movies. He has published about fifty short stories and about 600 short-short stories. He has won more than twenty-five literary awards including a third-prize of the prestigious bi-annual “Zhong Jun (中骏杯) Selected Fiction Award (2016–2017).”

 

Yuan Yaqin (19??–) works as the editor-in-chief for the Hunan University Journal. She has written a collection of stories entitled Red Beetles, and a novel, Give Women a Chance.*

 

Yun Liang (1966–) is the pseudonym of Li Yunliang (李云亮), a native of Zhangqiu, Shandong. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. A novelist and poet, he has published four books of poetry and six novels that comprise a series. He has also published twenty-one novellas, thirty-five short stories, and twelve short-short stories. He has won six awards for his novels, eight for his novellas, ten for his short stories, and five for his short-short stories.

 

Z

Zha La Ga Hu (1930–), a well-known novelist, has written twenty books, including The Fall of the Golden Family and Legend of Gadamei Village. He has won ten literary awards at the regional and national levels. Some of his works have been translated into different languages or included in national textbooks. His name appears in International Authors and Writers Who’s Who as Hu Zha La Ga.*

 

Zhang Chaoshan (1973–), who was born in Heyuan, Guangdong, is a police officer in Zhuhai. He writes short-short stories, many of which are based on events he has experienced, which makes his writings quite unique. He has published two books of short-short stories and has won two short-short story awards.   

 

Zhang Guibin (1972–) has published in various literary periodicals and newspapers many poems as well as literary prose including fiction. He has won more than thirty national literary prizes and awards in China since 2006 when he started writing.

 

Zhang Jianzhong (1970–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of Anhui. He writes mostly short-short stories and some longer pieces of fiction, which appear in various newspapers and periodicals. He has published 101 short-short stories, five short stories and a novella. He has won ten awards for his short-short stories and one for a short story.

 

Zhang Jishu (1951–) was born in Feixiang, Hebei. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published more than 2,000 short-short stories, including ten collections, four of which are A Strange Dream, A Drunk Dream, A Story That Can’t Be Told, and A Love Dream. Many of his works have also been published outside of China.

 

Zhang Kaicheng (1958–) was born in Jiyuan, Henan. He has published stories, literary non-fiction and reportage in various publications, totaling about two thousand pages.*

 

Zhang Ke (1979–) was born and grew up in Hebei. She works as psychologist and writes in her spare time. She is a member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. Winner of multi short-short story contests, she has published five books of short-short stories including Young Dumplings, among other literary works.

Zhang Lianqin (1968–) is a member of Baishan Writers’ Association in Jilin. She is good at Chinese calligraphy and writes literary nonfiction besides short stories. Her literary writings have appeared in dozens of literary periodicals and newspapers in China and also outside of China.  

Zhang Nianliang (1967–), a senior Chinese teacher in Shaxi High School in Jiangsu, has published in different literary periodicals various literary works including short-short stories and poetry. He has authored three books of short-short stories and one of short stories, including one that comments on Sun Fangyou’s short-short stories.

 

Zhao Fengmin (1966–) is a writer based in Dongtai, Jiangsu. She has authored forty-two short-short stories, five short stories, and three novellas, among others. Some of her works have been included in high school reading materials. She has published five books of literary works including Yu Tai Yang Yi Qi Xing Zou (Walking Along with the Sun). She has won six prestigious awards for her short-short stories including the annual short-short story nomination award and the Sun Li (孙梨) Literary Award.

 

Zhao Zhiguang (1977–), whose pseudonym is Lu Xun (庐珣), is the Chair of Guangping County Short-Short Story Writers’ Society, Hebei. He also holds similar positions in several other literary societies and associations in Hebei, and also serves as an editor of five literary periodicals including two web magazines. He has published 300 short-short stories and twenty novellas. He has won ten prizes and awards for his short-short stories and two for his short stories.

 

Zheng Bili (1972–) is a native of Longchuan, Guangdong. She is a member of the Writers’ Association of Guangdong and a member of the Short-Short Writers’ Society of Guangdong. She works for the Agricultural Office of the Longchuan County government, Guangdong. She is also a part-time editor for Longchuan Literature and Arts.

 

Zhong Xiuli (1980–) lives and works in Meizhou, Guangdong. She is a member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of Guangdong. Her literary works have appeared in Yangcheng Evening News, Meizhou Daily, Heyuan Daily, Lingnan Fiction, among others.

 

Zhong Zimei (1942–) born in Bandung, Indonesia. He graduated from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. He is best known as a short-short science-fiction writer. He works and lives in Hong Kong.*

 

Zhong Zimei (1942–), born in Bandung, Indonesia, graduated from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. He is best known as a short-short science-fiction writer. He works and lives in Hong Kong.*

 

Zhou Daxin (1952–), widely respected author, has published more than thirty books and won many prestigious literary awards. More than ten of his works have been turned into plays and movies, including TV movies and radio plays, one of which won the Gold Bear medal at the 43th International Film Festival in Berlin.*

 

Zhou Qu (1964–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of Anhui, a committee member of Wuhu Writers’ Association, and also a committee member of the Super-Short Story Writers’ Association of China. He is a senior teacher and principal of a primary school. He also serves as an associate editor-in-chief of the Super-Short Story Paper. His stories have appeared in dozens of literary periodicals and newspapers inside and outside of China. He has won many literary prizes and awards, including the first prize of the “Guanghui Rule-by-Law Story Contest.”

Zhu Shiyuan (1954–) is a native of Huaiyin, Jiangsu. He has published two novels, five books of novellas, twelve of short stories, and five of short-short stories. Besides an award for his novel and one for his novella, he has won thirty-six short-short story prizes and awards. Presently, he is the editor-in-chief working for Duan Xiao Shuo (Short Fiction).

Zong Lihua (1971–) is winner of the Annual Best Chinese Short-Short Story Award. He has published nearly two hundred stories in different literary periodicals and other publications.*

____________________

*Translator’s note: The author’s biographical information may be outdated.