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About the 76 Authors of A New Anthology of Chinese Short-Short Stories: Ancient and Contemporary Romance, Social Ills, Twists and Turns in Life

©Copyright 2019 by Bestview Scholars Publishing. All rights reserved. The information on this website is posted to help prospective Bestview Scholars Publishing book buyers in making their informed purchase decisions only. No essay, story and excerpt may be downloaded or transmitted by any means for any purpose other than brief passages used in book reviews and purchase proposals to a bookstore or a library.

Notes: (1) The author’s country of residence is China unless indicated otherwise. (2) The asterisk indicates that the author’s information was provided around 2003 and may be outdated. Though every effort has been made to contact the living authors for an update, many of them could not be reached.


Ah Zhu (1957–), pseudonym of Liu Xuezhu, reporter and writer, who has published news articles and reportage. He has also co-authored An Introduction to the Culture of Tourism.*


Bai Xiaoyi (1960–) works for a literary magazine in Shenyang, Liaoning. A recognized short-short story writer, he has written many short-short stories.*


Cao Duoyong (1962–) was born in Dahe Village, Anhui. A Literary award winner, he has published a novel, The Dahe Bay, and several novellas, and many short-short stories.*


Chen Lifeng (1958–) was born and grew up in Henan. He has published many stories as well as essays on social issues, totaling more than one hundred pieces. He is the associate editor-in-chief of a college journal in Henan.*


Chen Yonglin (1972–) is an editor working for the prestigious Chinese magazine Selected weixing [short-short] Stories. Winner of a national short-short story contest, he is an active writer who has written many short-short stories.*

Chung Ling (1945–) was born in Chongqing but grew up in Taiwan. She received her PhD in comparative literature from the University of Wisconsin. A National Literary Award winner, she has written more than three collections of stories, including Short-Short Stories by Chung Ling, or Miniature Short Stories of Chung Ling as originally introduced (Chung Ling ji duan pian), The Predestined Lovers (Sheng si yuan jia), and The Great Wheel of Life (Da lun hui). She has taught at New York State University, Hong Kong University, and National Sun Yat-sen University, and has been director of the Teaching Affairs Department of National Kaohsiung University in Taiwan.*


Feng Jicai, (1942–) born in Tianjin, is one of the best-known authors in China, having written many books, including novels, collections of short stories, and literary non-fiction. He is presently in charge of the compiling and editing of eight thousand volumes of Chinese folklore and folk literature, four volumes on each county in China. Besides holding two important literary positions, Mr. Feng also serves as member of the Standing Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference and as vice-chairman of the China Association for Promoting Democracy.*

Gan Bao (317[?]–420[?]), a talented literary man and a knowledgeable historian, author of Collection of Fairy Tales (Sou shen ji), during the Eastern Jin Dynasty (AD 317–420). His original works have long been lost. The version available today was put together by later editor-scholars. More than four hundred of his stories have been collected, published in twenty volumes.


Gao Weixi (1933–2015) was a lifelong professional literary editor. Before his retirement he was the associate editor-in-chief of the prestigious Chinese bimonthly The Novelist and director of its editorial department. He authored many literary works, including a collection of short stories, Sailing in Love, and two collections of literary nonfiction, Irrational Passion and A Stormy Life. He spent most of retirement years in Toronto, Canada.

Gui Qianfu (1964–) was born in Luochuan, Shaanxi. He has published various literary works, totaling about six hundred pages.*


He Baiyuan (1941–), National Second-Class Writer, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. Also known as Yuan Bai, he is the editor-in-chief of Foshan Wenyi (Foshan Literature and Art). He has published eleven books of literary works. He has authored twenty novellas, sixty short stories, and more than 700 short-short stories. Eighteen of his stories and other literary pieces have been included in textbooks and reading materials for elementary schools, high schools, colleges, and universities. He has won more than sixty prizes and awards for his short-short stories, including eight national awards. He has also won the prestigious Bingxin Book Award, among other honors.


He Peng (1961–) was born in Qingshuihe County, Inner Mongolia. He is an invited committee member of the World’s Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story in Chinese. He has authored five books of short-short stories including Strange Disease, and has also published other works including three collections of literary reportage including Candle Light, and Green Romance. He has won ten awards, including a World’s Chinese Short-Short Story 40th Anniversary Contribution Award, among other honors.


Huang Fei (1946–), officially known as Li Huangfei, was born in Mianchi, Henan. He has written several collections of novellas and short stories. Some of his stories have been turned into TV movies. He works as a reporter for the Luoyang Daily. *

Huang, Harry J. (1956–), PhD in linguistics and translation studies, is a citizen of Canada and a retired English professor from Seneca College in Toronto, who is also known as Freeman J. Wong. He has been translating and writing short-short stories since 1981 when he started teaching Chinese–English translation in Sun Yat-sen University, until 1989. After immigrating to Canada thirty years ago, he started writing short-short stories in English and has published three collections of them (1990, 1996, 2000) while he continued to translate Chinese short-short stories partly for his Canadian students. He taught the Chinese short-short story at Seneca College for more than fifteen years, among other English courses. He has authored five books of short-short stories—one in Chinese (written in the 1980s, yet to be published), three in English, and one in English and Chinese, but he is best known as a translation scholar and an expert Chinese–English translator who has translated more than 200 Chinese authors’ short-short stories into English, among others. He has been highly regarded by many writers and readers in Canada, mainland China, Hong Kong, Macao, among other places. He has another long list of publications including textbooks and journal articles, etc. He has won a book award for his first An Anthology of Chinese Short-Short Stories, a World’s Chinese Short-Short Story 40th Anniversary Contribution Award, and other honors. If time permits, he intends to translate more Chinese short-short stories with the intention to firmly establish the literary status of the short-short story in the world.

Jiang Han (19??–) works for the Science and Technology Daily in China. He has published seven books of short stories and short-short stories including Kan Jian (《看见》), among other literary works.


Jiang Zilong (1941–), one of the most prominent writers in contemporary China, has published more than seventy literary works, of which Factory Director Qiao Starting His Job was turned into a popular movie loved by viewers throughout China.*


Li Jingwen (1961–), a National Class 1 Writer, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China and a committee member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. He lives and works in Jiangdu, Jiangsu. He has published two novels including Kan Tian (《看天》), one collection of novellas, one of short stories and one of short-short stories. He has won an award for a novella, one for a short story and sixteen for his short-short stories.

Li Yongkang (1964–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He mostly writes short-short fiction in his free time. He resides in Wenjiang, Sichuan. Besides five short stories, he has published two books of short-short stories. He has won twenty prizes and awards for his short-short stories.


Lin Ruqiu (1947–) was born in Minqing, Fujian. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published three collections of short and short-short stories, a book of literary non-fiction, and one of literary critiques. He was the associate editor-in-chief of Fujian Literature before retirement. He is now a lecturer at Fujian University for Seniors.

 

Ling Dingnian (1951–) is currently the Chair of the World’s Association for the Study of the Short-Short Story in Chinese. He is one of the most prolific short-short story writers in China and is known throughout the country and among Chinese short-short story writers outside of China. He has authored more than twenty books of short-short stories, three of short stories and a novella, among others, totaling thirty collections. He has also edited and published dozens of books of short-short stories for his peers. He has collected more than 320 literary prizes and awards in total. He is one of the few short-short story writers who also writes about short-short story writing techniques and has often been giving lectures to students in different schools.


Ling Junyang (1987–) has won various literary awards for his Chinese short-short stories, science fiction, and literary nonfiction. He has published a historical novel, a literary biography, a collection of literary nonfiction, and a collection of novellas and short stories.


Liu Fengzhen (1963–), winner of China’s National Short Literary Works Contest, has published dozens of short stories and short-short stories. She has also co-edited A Collection of Poems by North Shaanxi Women Poets.*

Liu Gong (1963–) is the editor-in-chief of a literary magazine. A member of the Writers’ Association of China, he is an established fiction writer who has published widely. His novel Ai Hao Tong (Love Is Painful) won a literary award in Shaanxi, and his collection of short stories and another collection of short-short stories were shortlisted for the prestigious Lu Xun Literary Award. Up till now, he has authored 289 short-short stories, eighteen short stories, three novellas, and three novels. He has won twenty-eight literary awards for his short-short stories, two for his short stories and one for a novel. He has also edited and published several anthologies of short-short stories. Two of his short-short stories have been made into short movies, one of which won an award at the 6th Asian Short Movies Festival.


Liu Guofang (1957–) was born in Linchuan, Jiangxi. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. Having won a long list of literary awards, he has published more than 2,600 short-short stories, many of which have been have been included in textbooks and anthologies. Some of them have been translated into foreign languages.

Liu Haitao (1955–) was born in Zhanjiang, Guangdong. He is a short-short story theorist, and also a member of the Chinese Writers’ Association. He is a special visiting professor at Hunan Science and Technology College. He has published more than two hundred research essays in various journals inside and outside of China. He is one of the scholars who started to study the Chinese short-short story in the 1980s and was also among the first to publish theoretical essays, including a monograph entitled The Chinese Short-Short Story: Theory and Writing Techniques. He has devoted much of his time to theoretical research on the short-short story, the science of writing and the study of overseas Chinese literature.


Liu Liqin (1966–) started his literary writing in the 1990s. He has published more than one hundred stories in different literary periodicals. He works for the Cultural Center of Zhenan County, Shaanxi.*

Liu Liying (1960–) is a full-time writer. National short-short story award winner, she has published 120 short-short stories and forty other literary pieces, including novellas and short stories.*


Liu Wanli (19??–) was born in Hanyin, Shaanxi. Winner of two national short-short story contests, he has published more than three hundred stories, including short-short stories, short stories, and novellas. He works for a newspaper in Shaanxi.*


Liu Wei (1960–) lives and works in Benxi, Liaoning. He has published four collections of prose, many short-short stories, and poems, among others.*


Liu Yiqing (403–444) was the author of many works, including A Collection of Tales of the Other World (You ming lu). This work, said to contain thirty (or twenty) volumes in its original form, was lost in the late fifth century, or in the Sui Dynasty (581–618). More than two hundred stories are still available, many of which are sketches, though some are fairly complete story-lines. Though the majority are ghost stories, some originated in folk tales. His writing style significantly influenced many writers in the later generations.


Lu Fuhong (1960–) is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. An award-winning writer, he has published twelve books of short-short stories, among other literary works.

Ma Baoshan (1948–) is an author of the Mongolian nationality but was born in Fuxin, Liaoning. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He started writing fiction around the age of thirty and has published two novels, ten novellas, more than twenty short stories, and over 200 short-short stories. He has won more than six short-short story awards at the national or provincial level, including the precious Gold Sparrow Award.


Ma Duangang (1970–) was born in Baotou, Inner Mongolia. He writes mostly fiction and has published a collection of novellas entitled Sunshine in the Afternoon. He works as an editor for a literary magazine in Inner Mongolia.*


Ma Fengchao (1935–) was born in Sanmenxia, Henan. He once worked as the associate editor-in-chief of the Sanmenxia Daily. A literary award winner, he has published short stories and reportage, totaling almost one hundred items.*


Ma Shaoxian (1938–), lifelong literary editor and writer, has published many literary essays as well as stories, including a book of literary non-fiction entitled Heartfelt Love (Ai zai xin zhong) and a biography which was written after she had suffered a severe stroke that disabled half of her body including her right hand and leg. A right-handed person, while suffering from constant pain every day, she learned to use her left hand. She hand-wrote her last Chinese book of 272 pages one character at a time, which was published in February 2019. She is also an excellent self-taught photographer.


Meng Meng (1948–) was born in Xianyang, Shaanxi. Winner of more than ten municipal and provincial awards, he has written four books and other works, including two novels, a collection of novellas and short stories and two collections of literary non-fiction as well as three scenarios.*

Mo Bai (1956–), born in Huaiyang, Henan, is a well-known fiction writer and playwright who started writing in 1984. He has published a trilogy of novels and three collections of novellas and short stories, four collections of short-short stories, another forty novellas and over ninety short stories, among others. He has won multiple short-short story awards, including the sixth Gold Sparrow Award.


Price, Robert (19??–), PhD, Ontario-based professor of English, has authored books and essays of various types. He is a highly respected professor who has taught reading, writing, the short story, and other college English subjects. A humorist who cheers up everyone around him, he is not only a role model for his students, but also a great mentor to his young colleagues. His professionalism, wisdom, high moral standards, and love for others influence students, colleagues, and friends far more than a book does.


Pu Songling (1640–1715) was born in Zichuan, or today’s Zibo, Shandong. For the greater part of his life, he was an impoverished teacher, but he published many works, including fiction, poems and books for the undereducated public. His masterpiece is A Collection of Weird Stories (Liao zhai zhi yi), which has been claimed to be a monumental book of short-short stories full of literary imagination. Some critics believe it is not only an important book of Chinese short stories, but also one that belongs to world literature. “Mr. Shen” is an average story taken from this book.


Ru Rongxing (1958–) was born in Jiaxing, Zhejiang. He is a committee member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. Winner of forty literary awards, he has, since 1982, published more than one thousand short-short stories and critiques, including twelve collections of short-short fiction.


Shao Baojian (1946–), born in Huzhou, Zhejiang, is an award-winning writer. He has written two collections of short-short stories. He works for the Huzhou Daily in Zhejiang.*

Si Yusheng (1956–) is the Associate Chair of Henan Short-Short Story Writers’ Society. Besides the previous collections, he has published seven books of short-short stories since 2015, among other literary pieces.


Sun Chunping (1950–), who belongs to the Manchu nationality, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He used to be a “zhi qing” (educated youth sent to work in the fields including mountainous areas) and a railroad worker. He is now the Chair of the Federation of Literary Writers and Artists of Shenyang and also Associate Chair of the Writers’ Association of Liaoning. He has published five novels, sixty novellas, 100 short stories and five books comprising 200 short-short stories. He has won an award for a novel, ten awards for his novellas, eight for his short stories, and five for his short-short stories.


Sun Fangyou (1950–2013), claimed by critics and readers to be one of the best, was a master short-short story writer whose writing techniques have influenced many young short-short fiction writers in China, especially those who write about the jiang hu shi jie (the underworld society). He started writing short-short stories in 1978 and was best known for his Chenzhou (a fictitious city) series. He had left dozens of books of short-short fiction including the well-known collection Women Bandits and another, Assassin. By 2004, he had already won sixty short-short story prizes and awards including top national honors. He became a full-time writer in 2002 and started to write longer pieces of fiction as well.


Tao Qian (365–427) is believed to be the author of Another Collection of Fairy Tales (Sou shen hou ji), despite all doubts raised. This work, which consists of ten volumes, by its name appears to be the continuation of Gan Bao’s Collection of Fairy Tales (Sou shen ji). An outstanding poet in Chinese literature, Tao Qian did not care for fame or money and had a free sexual life. After being an official for eighty days, he quit his job because of his resentment of government corruption and hypocrisy, and resumed a simple life in his home village.


Tao Ran (1943–2019) born in Bandung, Indonesia, was the editor-in-chief of Hong Kong Literary Press. By 2004 he had published twenty-two books, including three novels, eight collections of literary non-fiction, two of short-short stories, and many novellas and short stories, as well as poems. In 2000, Professor Cao Huimin of Beijing University published a book entitled Reading Tao Ran: Essays on Tao Ran’s Literary Works.

Teng Gang, (1962–) first-prize winner of a Chinese short-short story contest, has written Teng Gang’s Short-Short Stories, among others. He is one of the few Chinese short fiction writers who also explores sex-related topics.*

Wan Qian (1959–) is the pseudonym of Shen Ming (沈明). He is a member of Suzhou Writers’ Association. He has published 160 short-short stories in various provincial and national literary periodicals including Ren Min Wen Xue (People’s Literature), Zhong Guo Zuo Jia (China’s Authors), and Shou Huo (Harvests), among others. He has won many literary awards—he was already a three-time national short-short story contest winner back in 2005 when this translator’s first anthology of Chinese short-short stories was published.


Wang Jia (317[?]–420[?]) is believed to have lived somewhere between AD 317 and 420. His story included here is taken from his Collection of Anecdotes (Shi yi ji), which consists of ten volumes, most of which record stories about the emperors from ancient times up until the fourth century.


Wang Kuishan (1946–2012) was born in Queshan, Henan. A three-time winner of national short-short story contests, he started to publish literary works in 1981, including a collection of short-short stories entitled Wang Kuishan’s Short-Short Stories, among others.


Wong, Freeman J., pseudonym of Harry J Huang.


Wu Jinliang (1955–), winner of several literary awards, has written five books and many stories, including a collection of short stories, a literary biography, two novels and a collection of short-short stories entitled Wu Jinliang’s Short-Short Stories. Some of his works have been turned into movies or TV movies.*

Wu Wanfu (1968–), born in Guanshan County, Henan, is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published six books of short-short stories, one collection of short stories and one of novellas. He also writes poetry and literary nonfiction. He has won more than fifty literary prizes and awards including the Henan Literary Award, Feitian Fiction Award, and People’s Literature’s Literary Nonfiction Award.

Xia Xueqin (1963–) started to write in 1987. A winner of the first National Short-Short Story Contest (2001) in China, she has published in many literary periodicals and newspapers. She works for a district cultural center in Hangzhou.


Xie Zhiqiang (1954–) is a first-prize short fiction winner with a long list of publications. He has published a collection of short-short stories entitled War Between Shadows.*


Xing Ke (1937–), originally known as Xing Guoxi, was born in Qixia, Shandong. Also published under the pseudonyms Ke Ren and Zhu Xinkang, he used to work as an editor, then as associate editor-in-chief and later editor-in-chief for a literary magazine in Zhengzhou until retirement. Since 1958, he has published more than five hundred literary items, including novellas, short stories, short-short stories, poems and critiques. He has written four books including A Selection of Xing Ke’s Short-Short Stories. He has collected more than twenty literary awards at the local and national levels.*


Xing Qingjie (1970–), born in Yucheng, Shandong, is a member the Writers’ Association of China and a professional writer. He is the Chair of Dezhou Writers’ Association and is also a visiting professor at Dezhou College. He has published twenty-three books of literary works including fifteen books of short-short stories, seven of short stories, and a book of novellas. He has won more than forty literary prizes and awards, including a provincial TV broadcast award and a number of first prizes of national short-short story contests.

Xiu Shi (1954–), ex-Chair of Hong Kong Fiction Writers’ Association, is a poet, literary nonfiction writer, fiction writer, and critic. He has authored over 100 short-short stories, more than ten short stories, and a novella, and has published two books of short-short stories entitled Mou Ge Xiu Si Dun Nu Zi (A Certain Woman in Houston) and Hu Die Bu Zuo Meng (Butterflies Do Not Dream). He has also edited and published a book of short stories written by Hong Kong writers. He has won two literary awards for his short-short stories.


Xiu Xiangming (1958–) was born in Jimo, Shandong. Winner of two important national short-short story contests—one at the national level and one at the international level—he has published many short-short stories, winning several literary awards.*

 

Xu Junquan (1952–), born in Burma, is a Macao resident, whose parents and grandparents were Chinese citizens from Taishan, Guangdong. He has published four books of short-short stories. He has also edited and published more than ten other books of literary works. He has won 210 literary prizes and awards, ten of which were for his short-short stories.


Xu Xijun (1960–) was born in Guanyun, Jiangsu. He is the associate editor-in-chief of the Journal of Huaihai Polytechnic College and an adjunct professor at China University of Mining and Technology. He is also a writer and literary critic. Besides three important monographs, he has published over two thousand pages of literary works, including three books of short-short stories and literary nonfiction, among others. He has won more than fifty prizes and awards including literary awards and research awards.


Xu Xing (1923–2006) was born in Yixian County, Liaoning. He wrote more than ten books, including a collection of poems entitled Hard Journey, and two collections of stories, The Fourth Maple Leaf and Wild Roses.

Yan Chungou (1948–), Hong Kong resident and editor working for Cosmos Books, has also published under three pseudonyms: Mu Yi, Si Ren, and Leng Ying. He has won two literary awards in Hong Kong and one in Taiwan. He writes mostly literary non-fiction and short stories, and has published three collections of short stories, including Red and Green Lights, one of non-fiction, and a literary scenario entitled Bloody Rain.*

Yang Xiaomin, (19??–) editor-in-chief of the prestigious monthly Selected Short-Short Stories, has edited many collections of short-short stories, including A Collection of the Prize Winners of the Past 15 Years: From the Monthly Selected Short-Short Stories. He also writes short-short stories.*


Ye Dachun (1956–) was born in Wuhan, Hubei. He has written a novel, a collection of short stories, a collection of literary non-fiction and one of short-short stories, among others, totaling five thousand pages. He is a three-time winner of the Chinese Short-Short Story Contest.*


Ye Qingcheng (19??–), also known as Hu Qingzhi, lives and works in Wuhan, Hubei. A short-short story prize winner, she has authored six collections of literary non-fiction and three collections of stories.*


Yi De Er Fu (1944–), originally known as Ye Fu, started his literary career in 1972, writing many books, including a collection of short-short stories entitled Classified Reference Open to the Public, two of short stories, Springing Out and Stories by Yi De Er Fu, and one of novellas, Whose Fault. He has published many other works, such as short plays, TV scripts and literary non-fiction, as well as a book of his own calligraphy. He has collected nearly forty municipal, provincial and national literary awards. He has worked as an editor for several literary series.*


Yin Quansheng (1955–), well-known short-short story writer, was born in Neixiang, Henan. He has written a collection of short stories and four collections of short-short stories.*

Yin Yun (471–531) was the author of the thirty-volume Stories, which have been lost. His stories were popular tales of his time, with a distinct feature of folklore. “Fighting a Tiger” is one of those that remain. As recorded, Yin was “a man who doesn’t care about particulars, but well read and diligent at learning.”


Yu Rui (19??–), officially known as Fang Yurui, was born in Liu’an, Anhui. A multiple short-short story prize winner, he has published more than one hundred short-short stories, including a collection. He works for a museum as director and associate researcher.*

Yuan Yaqin (19??–) works as the editor-in-chief for the Hunan University Journal. She has written a collection of stories entitled Red Beetles, and a novel, Give Women a Chance.*


Zhang Chaoshan (1973–), who was born in Heyuan, Guangdong, is a police officer in Zhuhai. He writes short-short stories, many of which are based on events he has experienced, which makes his writings quite unique. He has published two books of short-short stories and has won two short-short story awards.


Zhang Jishu (1951–) was born in Feixiang, Hebei. He is a member of the Writers’ Association of China. He has published more than 2,000 short-short stories, including ten collections, four of which are A Strange Dream, A Drunk Dream, A Story That Can’t Be Told, and A Love Dream. Many of his works have also been published outside of China.


Zhang Ke (1979–) was born and grew up in Hebei. She works as psychologist and writes in her spare time. She is a member of the Short-Short Story Writers’ Society of China. Winner of multi short-short story contests, she has published five books of short-short stories including Young Dumplings, among other literary works.


Zhong Zimei (1942–), born in Bandung, Indonesia, graduated from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. He is best known as a short-short science-fiction writer. He works and lives in Hong Kong.*


Zhou Daxin (1952–), widely respected author, has published more than thirty books and won many prestigious literary awards. More than ten of his works have been turned into plays and movies, including TV movies and radio plays, one of which won the Gold Bear medal at the 43th International Film Festival in Berlin.*


Zong Lihua (1971–) is winner of the Annual Best Chinese Short-Short Story Award. He has published nearly two hundred stories in different literary periodicals and other publications.*


*Translator’s note: The author’s biographical information was provided around 2003 and has not been updated ever since.